Archive

Archive for June, 2016

Oracle SQL – Reading an Excel File (xlsx) as an External Table

June 21, 2016 16 comments

I’ve been thinking about it for quite a long time and never really had time to implement it, but it’s finally there : a pipelined table interface to read an Excel file (.xlsx) as if it were an external table.

It’s entirely implemented in PL/SQL using an object type (for the ODCI routines) and a package supporting the core functionalities.
Available for download on GitHub :

/mbleron/oracle/ExcelTable

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XML Namespaces 101

June 7, 2016 1 comment

Back to basics with a focus on XML namespaces.
A lot of people still struggle to use and reference namespaces correctly in XML-related functions, and most often try random combinations until it works correctly.
Hopefully, this post will clear a few things up :)

 

1. What is a namespace?

A namespace is not some exotic object but just one out of the two parts that form a node name.
In the XML Object Model, the node name of an element or attribute is composed of :

  • a namespace URI, i.e. the namespace name
  • a local name

If the namespace uri is absent (null), the node is said to be in no namespace.

 

2. Default namespaces and prefixes

In an XML document or fragment, a namespace can be defined in two ways :

  • namespace binding (prefix) declaration : xmlns:prefix="my-namespace-1"

    The scope is the element where it appears and all its descendant elements and attributes, unless it is redefined using another declaration (e.g. xmlns:prefix="my-namespace-2").
    A binding declaration applies to all qualified (i.e. prefixed) in-scope elements and attributes.

  • default namespace declaration : xmlns="my-default-ns"

    The scope is the element where it appears and all its descendants, unless it is redefined using another declaration (e.g. xmlns="new-default-ns") or undefined using an empty declaration (xmlns="").
    A default namespace declaration applies to all unqualified in-scope elements, but it does not apply to attributes.

Let’s consider a simple example :
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